Food Processing Grants, Deadline Nov. 7

The Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development (MDARD) is offering a
grant opportunity to promote the expansion of value-added agriculture production,
processing, and access within the state to enhance Michigan’s food and agriculture
industry.

MDARD will accept proposals that are intended to establish, retain, expand, attract
and/or develop value-added agricultural processing in Michigan; expand or develop regional food systems; or expand access to healthy food.

Funding Areas
Funding will be focused on the following types of projects:
Food hub development
Food access, including access to fresh/nutritional foods
Value-added food processing
Innovation and equipment
Technical assistance, including feasibility studies that lead to jobs/investment
Outreach and training

Grant Criteria
Grants will be awarded a maximum amount of $125,000. Applicants must provide a minimum 30% match.
Cash match is required, and in-kind contributions will not be counted as part of the required match.

Proposals are due Nov. 7. Contact us for more information on this grant program. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

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Food Processing Grants, Deadline Nov. 7

Community Food Projects, Deadline Nov. 28

Community Food Projects should be designed to (1): (A) meet the food needs of low-income people; (B) increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for their own food needs; and (C) promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues; and/or (2) meet specific state, local, or neighborhood food and agriculture needs for (A) infrastructure improvement and development; (B) planning for long-term solutions; or (C) the creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers.

Proposed projects should seek comprehensive solutions to problems across all food system levels, not just short-term food relief. This point is emphasized because some previously submitted proposals were denied funding because they were designed primarily for expanding efforts in food relief and assistance, or for connecting established or partially established programs (such as community gardens and farmers’ markets), with little evidence of strategic planning and participation by stakeholders. Proposals should emphasize a food system and/or food security approach and show evidence of information sharing, coalition building, and substantial outreach and linkages to the community.

The USDA and several other federal agencies offer programs that may help strengthen the impact and success of CFPs. These include:

  •     Food recovery and gleaning efforts;
  •     Connecting low-income urban consumers with rural food producers;
  •     Helping citizens leave public assistance and achieve self-sufficiency; and
  •     Using micro-enterprise and/or development projects related to community food needs.

Only private, nonprofit entities meeting the following three requirements are eligible to receive a CFP or PP grant: (a) have experience in the area of (i) community food work, particularly concerning small and medium-size farms, including the provision of food to people in low-income communities and the development of new markets in low-income communities for agricultural producers; or (ii) job training and business development activities for food-related activities in low-income communities; (b) demonstrate competency to implement a project, provide fiscal accountability, collect data, and prepare reports and other necessary documentation; and (c) demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers, evaluators, practitioners, and other interested parties, including a plan for dissemination of results.

Estimated Total Program Funding:     $5,000,000
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement:     Yes

Contact us for more information!

Community Food Projects, Deadline Nov. 28

Community Food Projects, Deadline Nov. 17

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE;

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

 Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program

NIFA  requests applications for the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program (CFPCGP) for fiscal year (FY) 2012 to support:  (1) the development of Community Food Projects with a one-time infusion of federal dollars to make such projects self-sustaining;  (2) Planning Projects to assess the food security needs and plan long-term solutions to help ensure food security in communities; and (3) a project that provides Training and Capacity Building on a nationwide basis to entities interested in developing new Community Food Projects or assisting current grantees and others to effectively operate their food security projects.  It is anticipated that the amount available for support of this program in FY 2012 will be approximately $5,000,000.  Prior to submitting their applications, prospective applicants are encouraged to participant in a Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program pre-application submission webinar.  The purpose of the webinar will be to discuss the matching requirement and what costs are allowable on the project.  It is strongly encouraged that all applicants participate in the webinar on October 27, 2011 between 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm Eastern Time. The webinar will be recorded and posted on the NIFA internet site for future reference.

 

1.  Community Food Projects (CFP)

Applicants should request a budget commensurate with the proposed project.  No single CFP award shall exceed $125,000 in any single year or more than $300,000 over three years.  Applications that exceed the budgetary guidelines will not be reviewed. Applicants may request one, two or three years of funding, but in all cases, the grant term may not exceed three years for any proposal.  A CFP project may be supported by only one grant under this program.  All CFP awards will be made based on the merit of the proposed project with budgets considered only after the merits of the project have been determined. USDA reserves the right to negotiate final budgets with successful applicants.

 2. Planning Projects (PP)

Applicants should request a budget commensurate with the proposed project.  No single PP award shall exceed $25,000 for the total budget period.  The maximum PP award period shall not exceed three years.  Applications that exceed the budgetary guidelines will not be reviewed. All PP awards will be made based on the merit of the proposed project with budgets considered only after the merits of the project have been determined. USDA reserves the right to negotiate final budgets with successful applicants.

3. Training and Capacity Building (TCB) Projects

 Applicants should request a budget commensurate with the proposed project.  It is anticipated that awards will be made for $500,000 total over a two to three year period. The grant term may not exceed three years.  Applications that exceed the budgetary guidelines will not be reviewed. Awards will be made based on the merit of the proposed project with budgets considered only after the merits of the project have been determined. USDA reserves the right to negotiate final budgets with successful applicants.

 

Eligible Applicants

1.  CFP, PP and TCB Eligibility

Only private, nonprofit entities meeting the following three requirements are eligible to receive a CFP or PP grant: (a) have experience in the area of (i) community food work, particularly concerning small and medium-size farms, including the provision of food to people in low-income communities and the development of new markets in low-income communities for agricultural producers; or (ii) job training and business development activities for food-related activities in low-income communities; (b) demonstrate competency to implement a project, provide fiscal accountability, collect data, and prepare reports and other necessary documentation; and (c) demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers, evaluators, practitioners,and other interested parties, including a plan for dissemination of results.

CFP and PP applicants MUST provide matching on a dollar-for-dollar basis for all federal funds awarded.  Match must be documented for all project years at the time the application is submitted. CFP and PP grantees may provide matching funds through cash and/or in-kind contributions, including third-party in-kind contributions fairly evaluated, including facilities.  The non-federal share of the funding may come from state government, local government, other non-profit entities, or private sources.  Examples of qualifying matching contributions may include direct costs such as:  rent for office space used exclusively for the funded project; duplication or postage costs; and staff time from an entity other than the applicant for job training or nutrition education.

 Matching funds are not required for the TCB award. 

Applicants and other interested parties are encouraged to contact Elizabeth Tuckermanty; National Program Leader, Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program; National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA; 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Mail Stop 2225 Washington, DC 20250-2225; telephone: 202-205-024;1 fax: 202-401-0776; e-mail: etuckermanty@nifa.usda.gov; or Katrena R. Hanks; Program Specialist, Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program; National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA; 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Mail Stop 2225; Washington, DC 20250-2241; telephone 202-401-5286; fax 202-401-4888; e-mail khanks@nifa.usda.gov.

Community Food Projects, Deadline Nov. 17